Monthly Archive: February 2016

Feb 26

Let’s talk (non-scientific) science!

From https://talkinboutregeneration.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/communication-in-science-cartoon.jpg

By Anna Pearson, WSU Vancouver Neuroscience Student Similar to how your Spanish teacher in high school requested that you speak the language in the classroom, working in the science field requires us to adopt technical communication skills, both verbal and oral. While that may be appropriate to collaborate with fellow scientists, it makes it challenging …

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Feb 10

How to Present Yourself to the World

elevator-pitch graphic-Priya

By Priya Kudva, WSU Vancouver Neuroscience student It’s a Friday night. You’ve been invited to a social gathering where you are told your potential new boss is attending as well. In a frenzy, you whip up an eloquent 1-2 minute speech about who you are and what you do. You memorize it and in a …

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Feb 10

Going up? The elevator speech

Elevator Image-Hanna

By Hanna Morris-Pinson, WSU Vancouver Neuroscience student Just talk about yourself for a little bit. No big deal, right? Well… maybe not. Elevator speeches typically range from thirty seconds to a minute or two in duration, and contrary to their name, they often occur in areas other than an elevator. This short timeframe, if utilized …

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Feb 10

Vaccines and autism: why science communication matters

By Carolyn Dudko, WSU Vancouver Neuroscience student Do vaccines cause autism? This has been an ongoing debate between mothers of autistic children and doctors and researchers. Mothers claiming that after their children received their MMR vaccines, autistic characteristics began developing. Wakefield and colleagues came out with a study claiming that vaccines do in fact cause …

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